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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 94-100

Efficacy of Xbox Kinect virtual gaming system on hand function and quality of life in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis


Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Shamekh M El-Shamy
Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, 7, Ahmed El-Zayat Street, Bein El-Sarayat, Dokki, Giza, 12612
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/bfpt.bfpt_1_18

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Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in childhood, which exerts a negative effect on a child’s daily life. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Xbox Kinect system training on hand function and quality of life in children with JIA. Patients and methods A total of 34 children with JIA, with ages ranging from 8 to 12 years, were selected for this randomized controlled study and randomly assigned into two groups. The study group received Xbox training involving five games for 50 min a day, three times a week for 12 weeks, plus conventional treatment. The control group received conventional treatment alone. Outcomes were hand grip strength measured using a handheld dynamometer, hand function measured using the Duruöz Hand Index, and quality of life measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of intervention. Results Children in the study group showed significant improvement when compared with those in the control group. The grip strength after treatment was 24.4 and 17.5 kg for the study group and control group, respectively. The hand function scores after treatment were 5.2 and 15.7 for the study group and control group, respectively. The quality-of-life scores after treatment were 85.4 and 66.2 for the study group and control group, respectively. Conclusion Xbox Kinect system training plus conventional treatment increases grip strength, hand function, and quality of life in children with JIA.


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