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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42-47

Effect of sex and neck positions on hand grip strength in healthy normal adults: a cross-sectional, observational study


1 Department of Physical Therapy Basic Science, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Jordan, Jordan
3 Cairo University Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Doaa I Amin
Department of Physical Therapy Basic Science, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, 7 Ahmed Elzayyat St., Dokki, Giza 12613
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-6611.188028

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Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of sex and neck positions on hand grip strength in healthy normal adults. Materials and methods One hundred healthy adults of both sexes participated in this study. They were recruited from the students of the faculty of physical Therapy. Their ages ranged between 17 and 25 years. They were assigned to two equal groups according to their sex. Hand grip strength was measured in several neck positions. Grip strength was measured by using the Jamar handheld dynamometer, and the neck range of motion was measured by using the cervical range of motion. Results Among females, there was a significant difference between the hand grip strength in neutral position and in other neck positions (P=0.036). Among males, there was a significant difference between the hand grip strength in the neutral position and in other neck positions. Within neck positions, there was a significant difference (P<0.001). In addition, there was a significant difference in the hand grip strength in various neck positions between the female and male groups (P<0.001). Conclusion Hand grip strength was affected by changing the neck positions in both sexes and the maximum grip strength measurement was in the neutral position of the neck.


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